Light at the end of the dialysis tunnel . . .

Yesterday I took an early morning train between Kingston and Toronto. When I got to Union Station (in Toronto) I walked through the underground (cause it’s damn cold here in Canada), dropped my luggage off at my hotel and went to St. Michael’s Hospital for an appointment.

I met with Dr. Stuart a Urologist.ย (I felt a little strange in a waiting room filled with men – predominantly.)

Dr. Stuart will be the surgeon who gives me my new kidney – performs the kidney transplant surgery. And we even have a history; he’s done a few of my “living with Kidney Disease related procedures”ย . . . and he removed my last transplanted kidney (when the time came).

Our meeting was short.

He looked through my file.

Together we clarified a few points on my Thyroid Cancer and the completion of my pre-transplant tests.

We talked about the dramatic benefit of my aggressive dialysis schedule and my fitness regiment. ๐Ÿ™‚

As we parted ways, I asked him, “Sooooo, how will I know when I am officially on the transplant list.”

He replied . . .

“You’re on the transplant list now. I put you on now.”

NOT WHAT I EXPECTED.

WHAT AN AMAZING SURPRISE!!
*drum roll please*

I am officially back on the transplant list to get a new kidney!!!!!!!

After I left my appointment, I walked around Toronto in a daze.

I finally got my official notice and I was so happy that I couldn’t quite fathom the news. Shock!!!

So now the waiting begins. (I am so thankful to finally get this amazing confirmation that I am in the running to get a new kidney.)ย 

Thanks for being part of this journey in my life. I will continue to keep you in the loop.

Hugs!!!

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14 Responses to Light at the end of the dialysis tunnel . . .

  1. Bell, Daryl W. says:

    FANTASTIC!!!!

    Professional Practice Leader Spiritual Care
    KGH Lead Patient and Family Centred Care
    613 549-6666 X4424

    KGH’s definition for Patient and Family Centred Care is
    Respect me, Hear me, Work with me

  2. Lynda says:

    Congratulations Karen, awesome news!!

  3. Jackie Hawrysh says:

    Yahoo, so happy for you

  4. Laurie Berg says:

    So happy for you! Lots of love, Laurie

  5. Vicky Laforge says:

    Omg!!!!!! YOU did it!!!!
    This is great news!โ™กโ™กโ™กโ™กโ™กโ™ก

  6. Chris says:

    WOW! Excellent news Karen. You’ve worked very hard at getting to this point…glow in the light.

  7. Dee says:

    Congratulations on your good news. I was wondering if you have to be a certain age to be considered for a kidney transplant? My mom has kidney failure for almost a year and a half and they said she couldn’t get a transplant because she is elderly, whom will be 69 in March.

    • kns544 says:

      Thank you, Dee. In Canada the criteria to be eligible for a transplant takes into consideration more than a person’s age – a complicated formula of metrics specific to each individual. And even though I am in my early 40’s, one transplant centre didn’t consider me a candidate for a transplant but another centre did. There is a lot to be taken into consideration. I greatly helped my own case to be considered by doing extra with my own health care and also by demonstrating I was very physically fit (and committed to that). Each case is different. Best wishes for your Mom.

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